Tuesday, June 26, 2012

A Book Review: Ships that Pass by Shashi Deshpande


Be ready for an intense emotional, literary upheaval as you get more and more involved in this story. Let me warn you, the story is slow paced. The story line is simple: it takes you through the life and emotions of Radhika who surprises her family by declaring (much to their disappointment) that she is done with studying and that she wants them to find a suitable groom for her. She feels disappointed by their lukewarm reaction and is in a hurry to get married, probably because she feels bored and has nothing special she wants to do in life and marriage, as the society often points out, seems like a perfect solution.   



Except that when she meets Ghanashyam, the ‘suitable’ groom, she is not too comfortable with the way they act their roles and try to be individuals they aren’t with each other. She behaves artificially with him and it makes her wonder whether two strangers who are playacting with one another can possibly make a marriage work in a spirit of love and understanding.  

During the time this confusion sets in her mind and she begins questioning herself on the very purpose of getting married, she receives a letter from her brother in law Shaan whom she is closer to than her beautiful, near perfect older sister, Tara. The letter disturbs her as it urgently asks her to come and stay with them for a few days as Tara is apparently not well and not communicating even to Shaan.

So, a determined younger sister packs her things and comes to stay with her older sister whom she hardly knew, liked or understood while they were growing up. What she discovers in her sister’s near perfect life devastates her. She begins to think seriously and questions emerge in her mind:

  1. So called ‘perfect’ couples as perceived by the society – does anyone even have a clue what their real, pain filled lives are like? What is the point of creating an illusion like that and living it for the rest of one’s lives?
  2. Is marriage a riddle that others can never understand? Why?
  3. What creates a perfect marriage?

At the time she is staying with her sister, she meets Ram Mohan, her sister’s old friend and loyal admirer. She is irritated by his adoration and close friendship with her beautiful sister but she also believes he is extremely kind, compassionate and sincere. Gradually, she begins to trust him and in certain moments of distress, she finds herself turning to him and relying on his judgement than that of any others.

As she grapples with the crumbling relationship between her brother in law and her sister, she finds herself becoming closer to her sister, whom she had always been envious of. Closer up, she realizes her sister’s life had been far from easy and completely different from what every one else had expected or anticipated it to be. From outside, her sister’s marriage looked perfect. Except that from inside, there was nothing left, not even anger, bitterness or indifference. It was like an empty box.

In moments of despair, Radhika turns to Ram Mohan who is older and wiser by several years.

One of his profound statements underlies the core of this novel and this reads:

“Marriage is a very strange thing. It’s a very public institution, it’s meant to tell the world that two people are going to live together, to declare that their children will be legal, that these children can inherit their property. It’s meant for social living, to ensure that some rules are observed so that men and women don’t cross the lines that are drawn for them. At the same time, marriage is an intensely personal affair. No outsider will ever know the state of some one else’s marriage. It’s a closed room, a locked room.”

This book is beautifully written, emotionally provocative and is a perfect read for those who enjoy literary fiction. Best of all, this is a book that questions all your beliefs, myths and details that populate the institution of marriage as it happens among Indians.

It makes you reflect, contemplate and ask, “What makes a marriage perfect? Will it work for me? If so, how can I be so sure?”

You won’t regret reading this book though it’s priced higher at Rs. 295 and spans 136 pages.

Monday, June 25, 2012

Kerala’s Matriarchal System: Smokescreen or Real?


Across India, people speak highly of Kerala’s highly famous ‘matriarchal’ system that enabled the daughters of the family to enjoy, own and manage their family property without any interference from the men folk. The culture of celebrating the birth of a girl child is perhaps another indication of how ‘advanced’ Kerala’s society had always been when it came to empowering the women folk. Honestly, I believe it’s ‘crap’!

People boast this about Kerala but even in the most educated families, it is the birth of a boy child that is eagerly awaited and boasted of. But a boy and a girl are not socially treated as equals even in the so-called egalitarian matriarchal system. All my life, I have heard many Keralites saying to my mother, “Oh no, you have two daughters and no sons!” with such sympathy that I'd love to whack the smiles off their faces!  So, yes, outwardly, I have come to believe that many Keralites celebrate the birth of daughters…other people’s daughters, to be more sarcastic. The social hypocrisy of this falsely, glorified system sucks! Seriously, what is the point of such hypocrisy? I don’t know. Or does being the recipient of such social hypocrisy make me less objective in my approach to this issue? Again, I don't know.

Framework of Kerala’s Matriarchal System
Having been born and brought up within this framework of this glorified, false ‘matriarchal’ system that is prevalent in Kerala, I find this label of ‘matriarchal’ system choking my conscience.

Why, I ask myself. Because I am fed up of the pretence of the so called, ridiculous ‘matriarchal’ system that has no relevance to most Menon women. The system exists on paper and in tradition but in practice, the system does not and has not existed for decades. It has been misused beyond words and no one wants to rake it up because it is timeless issue that is knotted up in the name of traditions.

Purpose of Kerala’s Glorified Matriarchal System
One obvious reason was to create a smokescreen of sorts to escape accountability.
This matriarchal system was and remains the smokescreen that helps to portray women as owners of the family property but it was always managed by the menfolk in the family. The men folk were either the uncles or older brothers who would don the role of legal guardians. By womenfolk, the traditional matriarchal system of the Menons pertains to the daughters of the family and their children.

This reduced chances of conflict or getting into legal disputes to a great extent because the conservative society always hesitates to drag women into any legal or property dispute. Also, which daughter or sister would take an uncle or brother to court alleging misuse of property or wealth? They reckoned wisely: almost none. They are right, aren’t they?

In fact, to ensure the womenfolk and their property rights are not challenged by the men who marry them, they devised a custom of marrying off the girls in the family to the male cousin. This way, the family property remains in the hands of the men who remain part of the family.

With education and the passage of time, this custom changed and it came to be understood that marriage between cousins is bad for the health of the children. But what I am saying is that the matriarchal system was never intended to safeguard the girl child or the women folk as we have been told to believe.

A Smart Social System That looks Noble From Surface
The over smart social pundits were shrewd enough to work out a system that looked very fair and just to the women in the society whereas what they were doing was to safeguard their own wealth and property related interests.

Here are some statements I have heard when it comes to implementing what the traditional matriarchal system demands

  1. Matriarchal system cannot be implemented any longer because the laws have changed.
  2. Social order has changed. Boy and girl are equal. There is no need for the matriarchal system to continue.

Equality between Boys and Girls in a Family
Then I have a question: if the law has changed then why are you still managing the  system as if it were existing? If boy and girl are equal, why do you object to a daughter’s or sister’s right to buy, sell or manage her property? Whom are you kidding in the name of matriarchal system? The boy always has the obvious, superior right. I don’t have a problem with that. What I have a problem with is that you portray one thing in the name of a matriarchal system and then you do the opposite and continue to do the opposite!

So funny, it’s almost laughable. If it was real and implemented in the real spirit of the tradition, I’d say, “Hats off!” But I’ve never had an occasion to say it so I really can’t.

Truth is simple, really: You enjoy the benefits of the matriarchal system and look socially respectable to others but in effect, you are providing only for yourself and not for the actual womenfolk for whose welfare it was intended for. System sucks and no one out there has the guts to come right out and say this!

By tying up a family’s property into the ownership of its women, the smart men did themselves a favour than anyone else. They could use the woman’s property as they pleased and be accountable to none, not even the law because in name and therefore
in evidence, it is always the women who are the ‘owners.’

However, there are many families that do conform to this matriarchal system with a sense of justice but those families are very few and I admire them if they are able to do the impossible. This post in no way applies to such families.

The ‘matriarchal’ tag will continue in Kerala as long as there are vested property related interests. I also know that this one blog post will not change anything. But at least one person reading this post may think twice before praising Kerala’s matriarchal system. That’s good enough for me.

♥♥  I thank you with all my heart for reading my post. I dedicate this post with love and gratitude to all those who want to bring positive change in the Indian society. REQUEST: Please SHARE this article on your favorite social networks. Every share, like or tweet makes me reach out to more people who love and support the growth of better world. I am grateful and I appreciate you for doing so. ♥♥

Sunday, June 24, 2012

Axess Legal Corp: The True Story of A Dream Come True

“The three great essentials to achieve anything worthwhile are, first, hard work; second, stick-to-itiveness; third, common sense.” ― Thomas A. Edison

Disclaimer: My personal association with Axess Legal Corp is from 2008 to 2011. I am not professionally associated with Axess Legal Corp from 2011 to 2012.

Axess Legal Corp: How it all began
The founding of Axess Legal Corp has an interesting background story to it. It was in August 2008 that my husband Sanand Ramakrishnan took a decision that changed the course of our lives once and forever. It also came about unexpectedly that the founding of Axess Legal Corp coincided with a personal tragedy that happened to me. A grief stricken person is hardly a good support when a new venture begins but I believe that though I was grief stricken, I gave my best possible support to Sanand while he was focused on establishing ALC. 

To be honest, it was the toughest of times back then and there were days when I looked into the future without hope because I knew we had taken a big step forward at a very difficult time. All we could do was to believe God would take us forward with this big step and bless our endeavors because our intentions were always noble and good than commercial or profit-oriented.

Let me tell you this honestly: Sanand and I are good, honest human beings who have never planned out life by calculating the profit and wealth part of it. The two of us truly believe that we work exceptionally hard and in the best honest way possible and therefore, God has and will continue to provide us with what we need and not necessarily provide for our greed. Hope you get the drift of what I am saying. :D

We also believe in going with the unexpected and the two of us are intuitively tuned into the present. This has its share of big risks involved. But let's see it this way: we have one life to live and what's the fun if we don't take risks huh?

Axess Legal Corp: A Dream Come True
Coming back to what I was saying, Axess Legal Corp began on a dream. I am proud to say that Sanand and his colleague and ALC Partner, Rajeev held endless discussions on what they wanted to bring forward by working on this dream. They were also very open to my ideas. In fact, the very name 'Axess Legal Corp' was chosen by Sanand and Rajeev from a list of names that I had drawn up. It gives me great honor and pleasure that they chose and liked this name. And that is my only 'tangible' contribution to Axess Legal Corp so far. Within months, Axess Legal Corp had a new member too and that's  Arun Francis, who is another good friend and colleague of both Sanand and Rajeev.  Officially, Axess Legal Corp began functioning from Arun's High Court chambers. But do you know what the most interesting part was? None of this had been planned. It evolved like the will of God. It continues to evolve to reach better heights by God's Will and Grace.

Being spiritual also helped us to work on what we wanted from this dream called Axess Legal Corp. The dream was to make access to law easy, convenient and affordable to those who were struggling to get access to justice. The dream was not to mint money off clients, get postponements one after the other and deliver shoddy work and charge exorbitantly.  The dream continues to grow strong.

Axess Legal Corp: Launched in 2008 without any marketing gimmicks
So, in August 2008, Axess Legal Corp came into being without fanfare, pomp or any kind of showy celebrations. We did it low key because we believe that finally it is the results that speak and not the pomp, the show or even the marketing. If you aren't able to deliver the result, there's really no point of showcasing anything at all. Maybe our approach would be a nightmare to those who are legal marketers but this worked very well for us because our down to earth approach won Axess Legal Corp tremendous trust and good will from within the legal industry and the legal network itself. 

Right from the beginning, we were clear about the following:

1. Axess Legal Corp would not involve in any matters that involved any kind of shady deals. Trust me, this is a core value ALC has adhered to despite many 'interesting' offers that came their way at the start. We believe in working hard and working honestly even if it means struggling during the initial years.

2. No client would be charged unfairly or exorbitantly just because he/she had the purchasing power to be charged high. Whatever fees were charged would be made clear from the start and not towards the end wherein a client is left with no choice but to somehow cough up the fees. Transparency in charging became a core value so that it enabled clients to trust ALC. This again won ALC respect among the early clients who were used to being 'overcharged' at every phase of the legal process.  

3.  Being accountable and honest to client is another core value. If a matter looks most unlikely to win, there would be no false promises made, no marketing gimmicks, everything is communicated to the client up front so that if he/she still wants to go through the whole legal process, then we take it forward after having thoroughly briefed the client.

Axess Legal Corp opens 2nd New Office on 10th May 2012
On May 10, 2012, Axess Legal Corp opened it's second new office. The date itself was unplanned because the construction related work was going on in the new office but it happened on a Thursday which has always been a blessed 'Sai' day for Sanand and myself and best of all, it happened to be Sanand's 35th birthday - another important milestone in his life and career.

God's Omnipresence in a Law Office? Impossible to believe!
Today, for the first time, I visited the new office. It felt like a dream. The new Axess Legal Corp office looks beautiful as it did when we first dreamt of it and discussed it during those tough, hard days when we had no idea how it would eventually evolve. I felt so emotional as I went through each room of Axess Legal Corp's new office and how tastefully it was furnished and beautifully laid out. The atmosphere is so positive, welcoming and it's the kind of place that inspires trust and respect in those who drop by to visit. 

I felt tears in my eyes because the Dream of Axess Legal Corp that had begun to fly at a very difficult, tragic period in my life  has evolved so beautifully. Yes, it has taken years of hard work, integrity and lot of pain to make this happen. But more than anything, it teaches me to trust the Will of God. Today, if I had to say one clear thing about Axess Legal Corp is that it has God's abundant grace and love. You can actually feel it when you step inside. And perhaps I would like to believe no other law office would have God's omnipresence resonating there as it does in ALC. :D

When your values are made of solid gold and your dream is ideal, everything in the Universe comes together to make it happen for you. Many people - friends, colleagues, acquaintances, and others - also support you to make it happen. 

Most importantly, God steps in to do the unexpected for you because after all, when you are working with honesty and integrity to help others who are in distress, you are accidentally choosing to do God's work. 

Saturday, June 23, 2012

Jyotiraditya at Payyambalam Beach

You can see my son Jyotiraditya running towards his own sand signature 'ADI.' I love this snapshot. We went to the beach early morning so that we could let Adi play without getting too much exposure to the blazing sun. 





Even as six in the morning, it was bright, airy and the breeze was strong. The waves were becoming increasingly turbulent. This meant that I was constantly cranky and worried about Adi whenever he tried getting closer to the waves. But I've got to confess: We totally loved the time that we spent on the beach together. It was pure fun.

Summer Vacation 2012 and Yummy Eating

This year, I took time off to be with my folks in Kerala and I had a great time traveling and spending time with my parents, my in laws, our extended families and so on. Also, for the first time in several years after marriage, I celebrated my birthday with my parents who were totally overjoyed because I hadn't done that in so many years. 


Here are some pics from the Summer Vacation 2012:


This photo is from our Ooty Trip. 





My 6 year old son Jyotiraditya thoroughly enjoyed acting his role of buttering toast during the usual breakfast buffet while I helped myself liberally to all that I shouldnt - pancakes with honey, strawberry milkshakes, puris, so on and so forth. I won't mention the fruit platter yet! :D


But the plate shown below is not mine, it is Adi's. He's got it a little messy but I'd rather have him taking it on his own and getting engaged with the process of eating than feed him like a baby. Now that Adi is growing up faster than before, I really want to see him eat without being fed or being fussed over. 



Adi liked having Sweet Corn Chicken Soup and Chilly Chicken for dinner. I always have to tell the chefs to make sure the chicken is not spicy because Adi has a very sensitive stomach. As you can guess, the last thing I want to deal with on a vacation trip is a stomach bug especially in summers. 



Thankfully, the food was delicious and the service was fantastic. So I have no complaints on that side. We enjoyed our holiday vacations visiting new places we hadn't gone to before and of course, sampling all the delicious food that was on offer for us.

Saturday, June 9, 2012

A Book Review: Why The Immortals of Meluha by Amish turned my expectations upside down

Before I talk about Amish's Shiva Trilogy 1: The Immortals of Meluha, let me give you a brief personal background about this.

The Shiva Concept Didn't Impress Inititally
My grandmother, while she lived, was an avid devotee of Lord Shiva and she felt His constant presence in her life in the form of "Ernakulathappan" the Shiva deity who is worshipped in Ernakulam city. She would go and pray there every morning and evening. The joy in her eyes and the excitement in her walk- it was like a woman in deep love and yes, she loved Lord Shiva more than anything. Her devotion ran deep and she tried her best to talk me into it...but the rebellious teenager I was, I have to confess here: I was totally contemptuous of the Shiva concept. I don't even know why I felt that way then.

My mother is also a Shiva Bhakt. However, because of the remarkable influence of my mother and grandmother, I began researching and reading upon the Shiva concept and I began to perceive the beauty, the underlying energy that forms the essence of the concept and yes, the sheer power/shakti aspect that comes alive within Shiva. 

Shiva Trilogy 1: The Immortals of Meluha and the Buzz on Twitter
Across Twitter, many tweeps spoke highly about Amish's Shiva Trilogy 1: The Immortals of Meluha. Though late, I bought the book three weeks ago and began reading it. I like to read a book without feeling pressurized by the opinions of other readers. But this book totally turned my expectations upside down. 



Here are some reasons why:

Shiva Trilogy 1: The Immortals of Meluha blends in refreshing perspective, clear, suspense filled narrative

Right from the beginning through the middle and towards the end, a reader feels on edge, wondering "Oh no, what will happen next to Shiva?" because though we may be familiar with Shiva Puran, the story makes you perceive Shiva's story with a refreshing perspective.  Shiva, the warrior and chieftain of a tribe, is persuaded by the famed descendants of the Suryavanshis (who claim Lord Rama belongs to their tribe) to fight the Chandravanshis whom they say are cruel, ruthless, violent beings that conduct violent terrorist attacks on the Suryavanshis.

Their belief is that the Savior who will appear and defeat evil will have a blue throat after drinking the divine drink Som Ras, and because Shiva who was given the drink, developed a blue throat. This conveys to the Suryavanshis that Shiva is indeed the Lord Neelkanth who will save them. He refuses to believe that he is Divine because of the Blue Throat but every one else completely trusts in his divine power. It is in this most unlikeliest of situations that he meets the beautiful Suryavanshi Princess Sati and he knows he has lost his heart to her. 

Shiva talks like the 'Guy Next Door'
The story of Shiva is narrated with clarity and simplicity. There were times when I cringed because Shiva's character seemed to speak like 'the guy next door' and I wondered whether that could be even remotely possible. But if the author's purpose was to connect Lord Shiva's story to the youths of today, then I'd say it's worth the try.

In fact, there is a line where Shiva says, "I only swear when the occasion demands it" which I felt was cheesy. But never mind, consider the larger purpose of getting iPad-crazy, tech-thinking Indians into reading about Shiva and what he represents, this is small compromise, don't you think?

Detailing  in Shiva Trilogy 1
But there were layers of detailing that I particularly admire in this book. For instance, Daksha's manipulation of Shiva's soft corner for the beautiful Princess Sati. Even the way Shiva's non-hierarchical mindset works, the way he treats others beneath and above him with tremendous dignity and sense of equality - these are typically not qualities that we learn to associate with the Shiva concept at first instance.  Also, he has endless questions about everything and a scientific, logical approach to problem solving, which convey to us more about his personality. Any kind of blind faith repels Shiva. His logical conversations with Nandi and Brihaspati are examples that will interest you while reading the book. Would you have believed that before reading this book? I am not so sure. 

Another equally important detail: Shiva's constant opposition of the caste division is very interesting to read as he presents logical arguments to counter the concept of caste divisions in the society. The extent of research that has gone into this is commendable and worth reading as well as analyzing.

Shiva, the "Macho Man" with the Vulnerable, Soft, Loving Nature
His glory and magnificence have been more austere than anything else but in this book, there's a courageous warrior we are introduced to but one who is deeply in love and yet the epitome of all that a woman would want in one who loves her and wants to woo her. The rough looking Shiva fools us because in love, he is gentle, caring, compassionate and yes, most devoted to winning the heart of the beautiful woman he loves. 

For example, there is a very touching conversation where a wise man tells Shiva that Sati has everything she needs but there is one thing she craves for the most and doesn't get: respect.  He advises Shiva that if he treats her with respect, she will begin to love him.

What a simple, profound piece of advice for men who are truly in love!  

Ending Shiva Trilogy 1 
And yes, the way Shiva Trilogy ended was completely unexpected. It ended at a most critical point when the reader would be gripping the book with feverish expectation to know what will happen next and Boom!, its the end. 

When I picked up Meghna Pant's One and a Half Wife, it is the title that evoked a curiosity in me more than the blurb that explains the story of a young Indian Immigrant girl whose Big American dream turns to ashes. To be honest, I’d say that there didn't seem to be a 'new-ness' to the way the blurb explained the story. In fact, if given a second chance, I’d suggest to the author to completely rewrite the blurb because it is plain dull and doesn't do justice to the subtle, exquisite nuances that underlines this deeply touching, well written story. 

Talking about nuances, I like the introduction of the story beginning with a parrot who picks up cards to predict the little girl Amara’s destiny as a ‘one and a half wife.’ The description is deeply touching and will evoke interesting memories with a distinct Indianess that all of us can relate to. The author adds a dash of subtle humor too, poking fun at the silliness of some outdated beliefs that Indian parents cling to.

One fakir studied the moles on Amara’s face and declared her unlucky. Another poked her ears with a steel pin and after comparing the wax inside her left ear to the one in her right, warned Biji of the presence of an evil eye. A holy man determined the strength of the breath exhaled from Amara’s nostrils and charted her husbandless future in accordance.

Guess you know now why I’m recommending this book. It’s well-crafted, warm, full of social relevance, identity crises that we all go through in life and it’s got many moments that can evoke memories lying within ourselves. Don’t miss reading this book.

One and a Half Wife: The Story
Amara is a good Indian girl who is groomed right from birth for the most important moment in a girl’s life. Typically, you'd have guessed what that is: the Big American Dream that would pave the way for finding the Prince. Indeed, all her struggles in life are for that. Like most Indian girls who grow up in orthodox families, Amara is taught not to argue with her parents or question their decisions about her life and especially about her marriage.

With the help of Dua Uncle who is Amara’s maternal uncle, Amara’s parents finally get the Green Card and go to America. This seems to signal the culimination of all their dreams for Amara’s marriage. But this doesn’t bring them the ‘social equality’ they dream of having. For instance, Amara’s cousins, Tina and Riya, are cold, aloof and distant to her. They treat her like a stray pet that has been picked up from the street. In school too, they show no recognition they are related to her. When she makes attempts to visit them or to talk to them, they shut the door in her face. While this may have stories within itself, it also conveys how several Indians, wherever they are, carry their social biases and unique identity traits with them.

Thus, Amara learns:
“It was consequently fitting for an immigrant to blend in with America like sugar with water or better still, to avoid a diabetic relationship, to blend in like air with water.”
“Everything fits together in America except the immigrant’s identity.”

The Twist in Amara’s Story
The turning point in Amara’s otherwise dull existence is that when Amara gets married to the millionaire Prashant Roy. The twists, the turns and the social nuances of pretending that a marriage is fine despite the long cold, silences between a husband and wife are well punctuated within the story itself. So, what makes Meghna Pant’s treatment of ‘divorce’ different?

Let me clarify. Acclaimed Indian authors such as Anita Desai, Anita Nair, Kavery Nambisan and Manju Kapur have explored multi faceted dimensions that map incredibly well to the conflicts and tensions that resonate in an Indian marriage. So, the question that inevitably pops up is this: ‘what has Meghna Pant done differently with this novel?”

Meghna Pant has treated Amara’s divorce as an opportunity than as a tragedy or the breakdown of a marriage that could have been made to work somehow. She portrays the social stigma associated with divorce in the Indian community but does not cease to showcase Amara’s divorce as a transition into a happier, better future. This approach is solution-oriented and practical. This contemporary accuracy and the level of detailing is what makes this book worth more than just one read.

On hearing about her divorce, for instance, Amara’s strong willed mother Biji tells her, “You, stupid, stupid girl, a daughter is a reflection of her mother. Now I will have to carry my ‘die-force’ shame on my head.”

But some months later, the same mother urges her to consider proposals from suitable men who are keen to marry her despite the divorce. That’s what I mean by saying Meghna Pant’s approach to all the problems Amara faces are “practical and solution-oriented.”

The more Amara tries to break out of her former mold, the more difficulties she faces. But one by one, she finds her way towards getting what she desires instead of what others desire. This begins Amara’s journey into the discovery of her self.

One and a Half Wife: Does Amara find love?

Read the book to find out. It’s worth reading. I can vouch for that. It won’t change your life or transform your unhappiness into instant joy. It offers no miracles but it gives you inner courage, the hope to move on despite the odds and the realization that every time we cross a difficult hurdle and fall, we grow new ways and methods to cross it without falling again.

One and a Half Wife: What does Amara learn?

  • Get in touch with what you desire. Then go out and do that.
  • You are only as weak as you allow yourself to be.
  • Your mind can be as strong as it can be delicate. It can be both a flower and a rock. So learn to define yourself.
♥♥  I thank you with all my heart for reading my post. I dedicate this post with love and gratitude to all those who enjoy reading books by Indian writers. REQUEST: Please SHARE this article on your favorite social networks. Every share, like or tweet makes me reach out to more people who love reading books by Indian writers. I am grateful and I appreciate you for doing so. ♥♥



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